Christmas Blues

I found out my husband has to work on Christmas Eve again this year, and that makes six nights that he’ll be gone this week. He’s doing his 29th Christmas Eve. So I figured I’d write a blues song for him. It’s pretty silly, but maybe I’ll find a band to play it for him someday. So, here’s the to blues and hoping I won’t lose my husband to packages.

My husband’s a UPS Santa.
Hitched to his brown tractor-trailer all day.
On the twenty-fourth of December
It becomes a brown Holiday sleigh

I’ve got the blues, Christmas blues, darling.
The holidays blues came to stay.
I’ve got starry-eyed blues just hoping
That he’ll make home by Christmas Day.

I really want him to find me,
Bring me hope and good cheer,
It’s the same Christmas longing,
I’ve had year after year after year.

I’ve got the blues, Christmas blues, darling.
The holidays blues came to stay.
I’ve got starry-eyed blues just hoping
That he’ll make home by Christmas Day.

The decorated tree’s in the corner,
With lights, ornaments, and a star,
I’m the only one adoring
All the holiday things laying around.

I’ve got the blues, Christmas blues, darling.
The holidays blues came to stay.
I’ve got starry-eyed blues just hoping
That he’ll make home by Christmas Day.

Christmas is always upsetting,
Just makes me one case of blues away.
When the North Wind goes blowing
And takes my true love away.

I’ve got the blues, Christmas blues, darling.
The holidays blues came to stay.
I’ve got starry-eyed blues just hoping
That he’ll make home by Christmas Day.

What’s that noise on the rooftop?
Is that Santa Claus in time?
No, It’s a brown International with
My darling, my husband up there.

I’ve got the blues, Christmas blues, darling.
The holidays blues came to stay.
I’ve got starry-eyed blues just hoping
That he’ll make home by Christmas Day.

He’s says he’s waving a hand,
At me as he passes this way,
He can’t stay for the dinner
I’ve been slaving for day after day.

I’ve got the blues, Christmas blues, darling.
The holidays blues came to stay.
I’ve got starry-eyed blues just hoping
That he’ll make home by Christmas Day.

Christmas comes once a year,
With it packages, boxes and bags.
It’s much too much for old Santa
So UPS always lends him a hand.

I’ve got the blues, Christmas blues, darling.
The holidays blues came to stay.
I’ve got starry-eyed blues just hoping
That he’ll make home by Christmas Day.

Christmas gives me the blues each year.
It’s not national news, just retire and stay.
If he’s not home for anyway.
It gives me the blues on Christmas Day.

 

Limerick Challenge: Week 46 Women

Limerick Challenge Week 46: Over The Years!

I haven’t tried my hand at a limerick for twenty years or so. My mother read us limericks as children and they were lovely silliness. Edward Lear caught all of us up in his style. His limericks and his Owl and the Pussy Cat were read more than once to four small children with wild vocabularies. Mom used the patterns of the poetry to calm us down and settle us in. We hated when she turned out the light, not because we were scared, but because we wanted the time to continue.

There is a strength to limericks that allows one to mock or support an idea. They are easy to remember, falling into the rhyming and syllable count. I loved the examples that this young mother gave. In fact, I was amazed that she is promoting the weekly contests out of her own pocket to give others the power to express themselves. She’s one of those young millennial that you find in the midst of thinking, writing, authoring. Strong women are the topic this week. So, mom, these are for you. (Oh, she’s Lois in the notes if you ever need to talk to her about me and my very normal insanity. Just peek at the bottom and like a jinni she’ll appear.)

 

 

My mother read books to us every night,
Teaching her children to read and write,
Her daughters so young,
Developed a tongue,
That made them unmanageable frights.

Okay, that was harder than it seemed. My mother did read to us every night if she weren’t falling over with exhaustion. And my sister and I are indeed frights for the women’s movement raising strong daughters. Hers in the hard sciences, mine in anthropology.

Genevieve's homework would nightly pursue,
The dreams of a dragon that would misconstrue,
That she was in charge,
With lethal energy large,
As her fictional writings of monsters she grew.

Limericks are supposed to be silly, but they don’t have to be. The syllables don’t have to be exact between lines, but the hard emphasis on the first grouping of syllables needs to be followed by two soft syllables. That’s no easy thing, unless you nap as mother reads.

My mother would spend her time counting sheep,
When she did global markets allowed her to reap,
Buckets of gold,
For the produce she sold,
As she took over bull markets and made them weep.

If you want help rhyming, there is a wonderful page called www.therhymezone.com that can help you rhyme almost anything. Balance your limerick on the tip of your tongue and see if you can find a pattern that soothes you.

Anyway, I’ll be posting more silliness later. Practicing formulaic poetry gives you the ability to change your style to match the need of the message you want to portray. I don’t see Limericks making it into my top ten forms, but then, I have a lot of practicing to do.